Constitutional Amendments

 

President George Washington

27 Constitutional Amendments
The US Constitution can be changed or have additions made to it. These additions, deletions and modifications are referred to as Constitutional Amendments.

Constitutional Amendments History
The first 10 amendments to the Constitution were parceled together and passed by the first session of Congress in 1791. This group of the first constitutional amendments are called the Bill of Rights.  An incredible number of Constitutional Amendments have since been introduced to Congress (over 5000) but only 33 of these have been accepted and formally proposed by Congress, although only 27 constitutional amendments have been ratified (approved). Only one of the constitutional amendments have been repealed (overturned) - the 21st Amendment that repealed Prohibition.

 

Constitutional Amendments 1 - 27
This page contains a summary of the Constitutional Amendments 1 - 27 with further access to additional, more detailed information. This selection of  articles provide interesting facts and information about the Constitutional Amendments in a simplified format that is ideal for kids, schools and homework.

Constitutional Amendments: Article 5 of the US Constitution
Article V of the US Constitution deals with the process of making Constitutional Amendments. Article 5 of the US Constitution states that constitutional amendments have to be passed by a two-thirds majority in both houses of the legislature (upper and lower houses of Congress). Constitutional amendments must then be ratified by three-fourths of states. and then by the states. Alternative procedures are also provided, but these are rarely used.

Constitutional Amendments: The First 10 Constitutional Amendments - the Bill of Rights
The links provide access to interesting, detailed articles that explain the meanings of each of the first 10 constitutional amendments together with a very short, simplified summary of what these constitutional amendments actually mean. The simplified summaries of the constitutional give easy, simple information for kids, schools and homework. The historical time period and presidencies when each of the Constitutional Amendments were approved by Congress (ratified) is also explained, putting all of the Constitutional Amendments into the correct time period.

 

Summary of Constitutional Amendments 1 - 10 (Bill of Rights)

1st Amendment The first amendment details Freedom of Religion, the Freedom of the Press and Freedom of Expression in the Constitution.
   
2nd Amendment The second amendment details the right to keep a weapon and use it to protect themselves.
   
3rd Amendment The third amendment details relates to the early Quartering Act with a summary stating that soldiers cannot take, or live, in a person's house without permission of the owner.
   
4th Amendment The fourth amendment details that a person or their property cannot be searched unless there is "probable cause" that a crime has been committed.
   
5th Amendment The fifth amendment details the need for 'due process of the law' before punishing a person and the right to a trial by jury as detailed in the Constitution.
   
6th Amendment The sixth amendment details the right to a fair Trial and covering the subject of Witnesses
   
7th Amendment The seventh amendment details trial by Jury in Civil Cases & the rights of those being sued
   
8th Amendment The eighth amendment details limitations on imposing excessive bail, excessive fines, or any cruel and unusual punishments
   
9th Amendment The ninth amendment states that the Constitutional Amendments does not include all of the rights of the people and the states.
   
10th Amendment The tenth amendment states that any powers that the Constitution does not give to the US government, belong to the individual states and  the people

Summary of Constitutional Amendments 1 - 10 (Bill of Rights)

 

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Constitutional Amendments: Constitutional Amendments 11 - 27
The links provide access to interesting, detailed articles that explain the meanings of each of the constitutional amendments numbered 11-27 together with a short, simplified summary of what these constitutional amendments actually mean. The simplified summaries of the constitutional amendments 11 - 27 provide easy, simple information for kids, schools and homework. The historical time period and presidencies when each of the Constitutional Amendments 11 - 27 were approved by Congress (ratified) is also explained, putting all of the Constitutional Amendments into the correct time period.

 

Constitutional Amendments - Amendments 11-27

11th Amendment The 11th Amendment was made in 1795 during the presidency of George Washington stating that citizens cannot sue states in federal courts
   
12th Amendment The 12th Amendment was made in 1804 that changed Presidential election rules in the Constitution.
   
13th Amendment The 13th Amendment was ratified in 1865 ending slavery in the United States.
   
14th Amendment The 14th Amendment  was ratified in 1868 stating that every person born in the US is a citizen. States must follow due process of law before taking away any citizen's rights or property.
   
15th Amendment The 15th Amendment was ratified in 1870 stating that a citizen's right to vote cannot be taken away because of race, the color of their skin, or because they were previously slaves. 
   
16th Amendment The sixteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1913 authorizing Congress to collect income taxes.
   
17th Amendment The seventeenth Amendment was ratified in 1913 stating that people will elect Senators. Before this, Senators were elected by state legislatures.
   
18th Amendment The eighteenth Amendment  was passed in 1919 banning the sale, production, importation, and transportation of alcohol across the nation. The Prohibition era lasted from 1920 - 1933.
   
19th Amendment The nineteenth Amendment was passed in 1920 which guaranteed women the right to vote. 
   
20th Amendment The twentieth Amendment was ratified in 1933 that changed the days for meetings of Congress and for the start of the President's term of office. 
   
21st Amendment The twenty-first Amendment to the Constitution repealed (overturned) Prohibition in 1933. 
   
22nd Amendment The twenty-second Amendment was made to in 1951 stating that a person may not be elected President more than twice.
   
23rd Amendment The twenty-third Amendment was made in 1961 giving the people in the District of Columbia the right to vote for President. 
   
24th Amendment The twenty-fourth Amendment was made in 1964 making it illegal to make anyone pay a tax to have the right to vote.
   
25th Amendment The twenty-fifth Amendment was made in 1964 changing what happens if a President or Vice President dies, resigns, or is not able to do the job.
   
26th Amendment The twenty-sixth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1971 giving 18-year-olds the right to vote.
   
27th Amendment The twenty-seventh Amendment was made in 1992, limiting how Congress can increase how much its members are paid.

Constitutional Amendments - Amendments 11-27

Constitutional Amendments for Kids - Video of the American Presidents
The article on the Constitutional Amendments provides a summary of the amendments to the most important document in the history of America - the Constitution. The following video will give you important facts and dates about the political events experienced by all of the Presidents of America.

 

 

 

Constitutional Amendments for Kids
 
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What are the Constitutional Amendments?
Summary of Constitutional Amendments for Kids
Constitutional Amendments with summary of content
Interesting facts about the Constitutional Amendments for Kids
When were the US Constitutional Amendments written and adopted?
History of the Constitutional Amendments for Kids for schools, homework, kids and children
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