Executive Branch

 

Executive Branch of Government

The Executive Branch of US Government
This article contains a guide to the Executive Branch
of Government in the United States of America and its connection to the US Constitution. The Executive Branch is one of three branches of government (Legislative, Judiciary and Executive) that provide a controlled system by which everyone is bound by the Constitution, the Supreme law of the land. Each of the branches has a different function to make, enforce and interpret laws according to the Constitution. It has a system of controls called 'Checks and Balances' to ensure the balance of power is maintained and there is not an abuse of power.

What does the Executive Branch do?
The most common questions about this branch of government are "What does the Executive Branch do?", " What are the powers of the President and the Executive Branch?" and "What are the duties of the Executive Branch?". First things first. The President is the head of the Executive Branch which is the part of government that enforces the law and is responsible for the daily administration of the government.

 

The Executive Branch of Government
This article contains facts and information about the powers, duties, responsibilities and powers of the Executive Branch and how the Legislative and the Judiciary Branches can check the Executive.

Definition of the Executive Branch of Government
Definition:  The Executive Branch of Government is empowered to enforce the law. The Executive branch consists of the president, the vice president and all the people, departments and agencies that report to the president. The Executive Branch is responsible for administering and enforcing the laws that
Congress passes.

Members of the Executive Branch
There are over three million people who work in the Executive Branch. The three main areas are the Executive Office of the President (EOP); the cabinet and 15 executive departments.

The Executive Branch - The President
The President is assisted by official advisers he has appointed to head executive departments of government. The chief advisors of the President are collectively known as the Presidential Cabinet. The President and his Vice President are elected by the people every four years and have offices in the White House. The President has many duties. He is Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces and has the power to declare war, agree treaties, establish the armed forces and regulate foreign trade..

The Executive Branch - The Executive Office of the President (EOP)
The Executive Office of the President (EOP) is comprised of the immediate staff of the President and support staff who include policy experts in various fields. Their duties are to implement presidential policies and programs. The National Security Council (NSC) advises the president on national security and foreign policy matters. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) formulates the budget.

The Executive Branch - Agencies
The Executive Branch is assisted by various independent agencies (organizations) such as the Post Office, the CIA and the Environment Protection Agency. Other agencies include the Commission on Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Peace Corps and the Social Security Administration (SSA)

 

Presidential Seal

 

Powers of the Executive Branch of Government
The Executive Branch of Government has the power to enforce the laws as defined in Article II of the Constitution.

Powers of the Executive Branch of Government - Checks and Balances
The work and duties of the Executive Branch are subject to controls called Checks and Balance by the other two branches of government - the Legislative Branch and the Judicial Branch. The Checks and Balances are designed to minimize the risk of corruption, abuse, fraud and waste in the US government. The Checks and Balances that can be exercised by the other branches on the Executive Branch are detailed below.

Powers of the Executive Branch - Checks and Balances by the Legislative
The President must report to Congress by delivering a State of the Union address. Other Checks and Balances that can be exercised by the Legislative on the Executive division are as follows:
The Legislature has the power to refuse to pass a bill
The Legislature has the power to overrule presidential vetoes
The Legislative branch has the power to enforce impeachment proceedings to remove the president from office
When no candidate or Vice President has a majority of electoral college votes the legislature can choose the winner

Powers of the Executive Branch - Checks and Balances by the Judiciary
The Checks and Balances that can be exercised by the Judiciary on the Executive division are as follows:
The Judiciary has the power to declare executive orders unconstitutional
The Chief justice is designated as president of the Senate during presidential impeachment trials

Executive Branch
The article on the Executive Branch provides a fast overview of the US Government. The following Presidents of the USA video provides a useful educational resource for kids, children and schools.

 

 

 

Executive Branch
 
Executive Branch
The roles and duties of the Executive Division
Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives
Powers of the Executive division
Facts about the Executive division
The Checks and Balances on the Executive division
Important facts, and helpful Information on the Executive division for schools, homework, kids and children
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